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Grünes Gewölbe

The Green Vault contains the largest treasure collection in Europe. The museum was founded in 1723 by Augustus the Strong of Poland and Saxony, and it features a variety of exhibits in styles from Baroque to Classicism. The Green Vault is named after the formerly malachite green painted column bases and capitals of the initial rooms. It has some claim to be the oldest museum in the world; it is older than the British Museum. In 1547, Holy Roman elector Moritz of Saxony ordered the construction an additional wing to Dresden Castle. Four of the added rooms on the first floor of the palace were given elaborate, molded plaster ceilings.[2] In these rooms, the column bases and capitals were painted a bluish-green color. Due to this coloring, the rooms were referred to as the “Green Vault.” The official name of these rooms, which were protected against fire and robbery by thick walls and iron shutters and doors, was “Privy Repository”.

Palais Großer Garten Dresden

Located in the heart of Dresden, the Grosser Garten is a popular place in which to relax, play sport and spend quality time with the family. The 147 hectares of park laid out in the baroque style have multiple pleasant surprises in store. The best way to acquaint yourself with them is on the Parkeisenbahn miniature railway. The steam locomotives Moritz and Lisa ply 7.2 kilometres of track, dropping off and picking up passengers at five stations serving the various sights and attractions, including the Carolaschlösschen restaurant, the stately Palais and the Mosaikbrunnen (Mosaic Fountain).

Semperoper

The Semperoper is the opera house of the Sächsische Staatsoper Dresden (Saxon State Opera) and the concert hall of the Staatskapelle Dresden (Saxon State Orchestra). It is also home to the Semperoper Ballett. The building is located near the Elbe River in the historic centre of Dresden, Germany.

The opera house was originally built by the architect Gottfried Semper in 1841. After a devastating fire in 1869, the opera house was rebuilt, partly again by Semper, and completed in 1878. The opera house has a long history of premieres, including major works by Richard Wagner and Richard Strauss.

The first opera house at the location of today’s Semperoper was built by the architect Gottfried Semper. It opened on 13 April 1841 with an opera by Carl Maria von Weber. The building style itself is debated among many, as it has features that appear in three styles: early Renaissance and Baroque, with Corinthian style pillars typical of Greek classical revival. Perhaps the most suitable label for this style would be eclecticism, where influences from many styles are used, a practice most common during this period.[1] Nevertheless, the opera building, Semper’s first, was regarded as one of the most beautiful European opera houses.Semperoper with the Theatre Square, 2011

Following a devastating fire in 1869, the citizens of Dresden immediately set about rebuilding their opera house. They demanded that Gottfried Semper do the reconstruction, even though he was then in exile because of his involvement in the May 1849 uprising in Dresden. The architect had his son, Manfred Semper, build the second opera house using his plans. Completed in 1878, it was built in Neo-Renaissance style. During the construction period, performances were held at the Gewerbehaussaal, which opened in 1870.

Going to Leipzig? – Come on a tour with us there! – More information here: Leipzigfreetours

The Church of our lady, Dresden Altstadt

The Dresden Frauenkirche (GermanDresdner Frauenkirche) is a Lutheran church in Dresden, the capital of the German state of Saxony. An earlier church building was Catholic until it became Protestant during the Reformation.

The old church was replaced in the 18th century by a larger Baroque Lutheran building. It is considered an outstanding example of Protestant sacred architecture, featuring one of the largest domes in Europe. It was originally built as a sign of the will of the citizens of Dresden to remain Protestant after their ruler had converted to Catholicism. It now also serves as a symbol of reconciliation between former warring enemies.

Built in the 18th century, the church was destroyed in the bombing of Dresden during World War II. The remaining ruins were left for 50 years as a war memorial, following decisions of local East German leaders. The church was rebuilt after the reunification of Germany, starting in 1994. The reconstruction of its exterior was completed in 2004, and the interior in 2005. The church was reconsecrated on 30 October 2005 with festive services lasting through the Protestant observance of Reformation Day on 31 October. The surrounding Neumarkt square with its many valuable baroque buildings was also reconstructed in 2004.

The Frauenkirche is often called a cathedral, but it is not the seat of a bishop; the church of the Landesbischof of the Evangelical-Lutheran Church of Saxony is the Church of the Cross. Once a month, an Anglican Evensong is held in English, by clergy from St. George’s Anglican Church, Berlin.

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